Archive for the ‘programming’ Category

The Death of Von Stabbingmore

 Posted by James Paige on March 12th, 2012

Last week I finished a new game for the 2012 Week Long OHR Random Collab Contest. This was a collaboration, and my randomly chosen team-mate was Sid “Thespazztikone” Tyler. He happens to be a master at making maptiles, which is one of my biggest weakpoints, so I was very happy to be teamed with him, and he didn’t seem too mad about me hogging all the plotscripting and textbox-writing fun.

The game we made is called The Death of Von Stabbingmore, and you can download it from here: slimesalad

  

The game is intended to be in the style of a point-and-click puzzle-adventure, although there is no pointing and clicking. All the controls are the standard OHRRPGCE interface for running around the map and fighting RPG battles. The puzzles are all built into the battles, requiring you to use the correct sequence of commands to win. I tried to make the dialog funny, and based on reactions I have gotten to it so far, I think I succeeded.

The game uses tall hero walkabouts, based on the WalkTall tech demo scripts that I wrote a few months back. In writing this game I found a fixed a few bugs with the OHR’s support for modifying walkabout sprite slices.

Vocabulary Mosaic

 Posted by James Paige on April 15th, 2010

I was asked to write a game design article for Hamsterspeak Issue #36. Instead of just writing an article, I wrote a game.

I had recently been playing a lot of Words-With-Friends with my Sister and my Brother-in-Law, and that had me thinking about word-tile games.

One thing I don’t like about word tile games is the limited size of the board quickly cramps the word space, and the double and triple score boxes force any winning strategy to emphasize small words on score boxes in favor of long words.

So I set out to make a word tile game that rewards long words most of all. The result was Vocabulary Mosaic.

There is more information about the making of the game in the hamsterspeak article.

[Download Vocabulary Mosaic]

DON’T EAT SOAP! An Educational Game Starring Bob the Hamster

 Posted by James Paige on June 6th, 2009

For the 2009 OHRRPGCE 8-bit contest,  I have taken it upon myself to do a public service, and I have created:

DON’T EAT SOAP!

An Educational Game Starring Bob the Hamster

Dont Eat Soap! - main title

Soap is bad for you to eat. It is good for washing your hands, but very very bad for you to put in your mouth. If soap ever accidentally gets in your mouth, spit it out! This game is an educational simulation using the latest in 8-bit gaming technology so that you can experience mouth-related soap accidents from the safety of your living-room without risk
of actual hospitalization.

August 2013 update:

I am please to announce that an updated version of Don’t Eat Soap has been released for the OUYA Console. This new version features 15 new levels (for a total of 40 levels) and 3 new enemies. There are also an assortment of small bugfixes and tiny improvements. Now you can not eat soap in even more style than before!

Remember! This is only a game! Do not try it at home!

Download it here in a ZIP file

Download it here as a Windows Installer

Download it here as a Mac App

This game is also available on the OUYA console!

StegaVorto: The Game that came to James in a Dream

 Posted by James Paige on November 23rd, 2008

Last tuesday night I had a dream… In this dream, Michael Sweet, frontman of 1980′s glam-rock hair-band “Stryper” appeared to me.. except he was wearing a business suit, and standing on the front lawn of a public library… and he challenged me to play a game, a strange game that I had never played before. When I awoke I knew that I had to program it…

Your challenge is to discover secret messages embedded in the works of great authors.. Secrets that have been waiting all along for you to find…

Download the Windows version of StegaVorto
Download the Mac OS X version of StegaVorto
Debian packages (preliminary) thanks to Miriam Ruiz
Android App (preliminary)
Download the source-code of StegaVorto (Linux, BSD, Other)

The source code is written using python and pygame.

Alternatively you can get the source code using Subversion to check out

svn://gilgamesh.HamsterRepublic.com/hamster/stegavorto

The source code is under the GPL


2008-11-24: Updated! Check out new features such as author portraits, difficulty levels, and visualization of missed letters.
2008-12-10: Updated! More polish on levels, added a victory screen when you complete a level, and default to full-screen
2008-12-23: Many thanks to pygame developer René Dudfield who discovered how to fix the music problem (not just for StegaVorto, but for all pygame games that play music the same way StegaVorto does on the Mac)
2011-08-17: Updated! Added an Android version. Removed the flakey picsearch feature, and replace it with additional joyous kittens!

Provide Excellent Customer Service through SMASHING!

 Posted by James Paige on April 6th, 2008

Pyweek just ended, and my team *barely* got our entry submitted in time. At 6 days, 23 hours, 59 minutes and 30 seconds, I was literally shouting “Where is the upload button!? Why can’t I find the upload button!? It was here yesterday!”

You can download my team’s game here. I would also recommend checking out the numerous other nifty entries (although most of them are distributed as source code so you may have to install Python and some libraries)

(Old) Bob the Hamster Sidescroller

 Posted by James Paige on February 12th, 2008


I recently ported some of my ancient QuickBasic code to FreeBasic. One such piece of code was an old unfinished prototype of a Bob the Hamster jump-and-run side scrolling game.

You can download the results here ↵
bob-old-sidescroller.zip

You can move Bob around a single level, and interact with a few objects, although there are no enemies to fight.

This code is notable in O.H.R.RPG.C.E history because, as best as I can remember, it is the first Hamster Republic code to use the multi-directional scrolling code used for the OHRRPGCE’s maps.

I have no plans to finish this code, but I do have another sidescroller in the works

Game Making Engine

 Posted by James Paige on February 16th, 2006

Current mood: out-of-sync with something

I usually like to post here about art, and that art is usually in the form of drawings. But I also believe in games-as-art. For something crazy like 9 years now, I have been working on a program called the OHRRPGCE which lets you make your own game with minimal programming knowledge. It is only good for old-school console-style RPG games similar to the NES and Super Nintendo Final Fantasy games– so if you are not into that you won’t be interested– but if you ARE into that, by all means, do play with this new toy.

People don’t often thing of game-making as art, and I think that is partly because the tools of the medium are so hard to pick up, let alone to master. You don’t have to be Rembrandt to pick up a paintbrush and slap some paint on a canvas. Most art is very approachable, even if it isn’t easy to do well. Programming games on the other hand requires you to spend hours, days, weeks, even months reading tutorials and manuals before you can even learn and understand enough to blit your first pixel. That is part of why I do this. This is not the same kind of tool the professionals use, but it is a tool that anybody can pick up.

My game maker used to be a DOS program, but yesterday I released a version that runs natively on Windows, making it that much more approachable for average non-programmers. If you want to try it out, you can download it from http://HamsterRepublic.com/dl/ohrrpgce-win-installer.exe

Bright sunshiney sneezy day

 Posted by James Paige on April 4th, 2005

Today is a beautiful day. It is a good day for painting things that have been burned. I wonder why fire is not more popular in art. Pyromania is so artsy.

I am currently eating potstickers and california rolls, and thinking about how to use perl compatable regular expression rules (regex’s) to guess the appropriate material code and oversize value for a set of human-readable price page filenames. That is the sort of stuff I do at work. Today is a very good day.